Saturn's dynamic aurorae 1 (Jan 24, 2004)

This is a single image from a sequence of three aurora images.

Astronomers combined ultraviolet images of Saturn's southern polar region with visible-light images of the planet and its rings to make this picture. The auroral display appears blue because of the glow of ultraviolet light. In reality, the aurora would appear red to an observer at Saturn because of the presence of glowing hydrogen in the atmosphere. On Earth, charged particles from the Sun collide with nitrogen and oxygen in the upper atmosphere, creating auroral displays colored mostly green and blue.

The ultraviolet image was taken on Jan. 24, 2004 by Hubble's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. Erich Karkoschka of the University of Arizona, USA used the telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys on March 22, 2004 to take the visible-light image.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, J. Clarke (Boston University, USA), and Z. Levay (STScI)

About the Image

Id:heic0504b
Type:Observation
Release date:16 February 2005, 20:00
Related releases:heic0504
Size:2261 x 1696 px

About the Object

Name:Saturn
Type:• Solar System : Planet : Type : Gas Giant
• Solar System : Planet : Feature : Atmosphere : Aurora
• X - Solar System Images/Videos

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Ultraviolet Hubble Space Telescope
STIS
Optical
B
439 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
Oiii
502 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
V
550 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
H-alpha
658 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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