Hubble's Sharpest Ever Colour View

This view of Mars, the sharpest photo ever taken from Earth, reveals small craters and other surface markings only about a dozen miles (a few tens of kilometres) across. (The spatial scale is 5 miles, or 8 kilometres per pixel). The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope snapped this image on Aug. 24, just a few days before the red planet's historic "close encounter" with Earth.

Among the Martian surface features are: numerous craters; several large volcanoes of the great Tharsis plateau along the upper left limb; and a large multi-ring impact basin, called Argyre, near image center. These kinds of features from past and present NASA spacecraft that have orbited Mars are also being studied in detail. But they have never before been seen from Earth with this kind of clarity.

Credit:

NASA/ESA, J. Bell (Cornell U.), and M. Wolff (Space Science Inst.) Additional image processing and analysis support from: K. Noll and A. Lubenow (STScI); M. Hubbard (Cornell U.); R. Morris (NASA/JSC); P. James (U. Toledo); S. Lee (U. Colorado); T. Clancy, B. Whitney and G. Videen (SSI); and Y. Shkuratov (Kharkov U.)

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0322i
Type:Observation
Release date:27 August 2003, 12:00
Size:1164 x 1164 px

About the Object

Name:Mars
Type:• Solar System : Planet
• Solar System : Planet : Feature : Surface : Ice
• X - Solar System Images/Videos

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
410 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
V
502 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
R
658 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

Image Formats

Large JPEG
199.3 KB
Screensize JPEG
125.4 KB

Wallpapers

1024x768
155.8 KB
1280x1024
230.2 KB
1600x1200
310.0 KB
2048x1536
448.4 KB

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