Hubble MACHO-LMC-5 2002

Astronomers have directly measured the mass of a single star; the first time such a feat has been accomplished for any solitary star other than our own Sun. The measurement has been done on a small red star located some 1,800 light-years from Earth. Knowing the masses of stars is important in understanding stellar evolution. Until now, scientists could only determine the masses of stars that are members of binary-star systems by applying Newton's laws of gravity to measurements of the stars' orbits around their center of gravity. The new measurement used Einstein's theory of relativity, combined with a large-scale program using ground-based telescopes, and the exquisite resolution of NASA's Hubble Space Telescope.

Credit:

NASA, ESA and D. Bennett (University of Notre Dame)

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0424d
Type:Observation
Release date:14 April 2004, 19:00
Size:506 x 505 px

About the Object

Name:MACHO-LMC-5 1994
Type:• Milky Way : Star
• Milky Way : Cosmology : Phenomenon : Lensing
• Local Universe : Star
• X - Star Clusters Images/Videos
Constellation:Mensa

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
V
606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

Image Formats

Large JPEG
62.3 KB
Screensize JPEG
124.3 KB

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