Super Star Clusters in Dust-Enshrouded Galaxy

The sharp eye of the Hubble Space Telescope's Advanced Camera for Surveys has uncovered more than 200 mammoth star clusters in the heart of the galaxy Arp 220.

The clusters are the bluish-white dots scattered throughout the image. The heftiest Arp 220 cluster - about 10 million solar masses - is twice as massive as any comparable star cluster in the Milky Way Galaxy. Arp 220 collided with another galaxy about 700 million years ago, fueling the frenzy of star birth in a small region about 5,000 light-years across. The galaxy is a nearby example of the aftermath of two colliding galaxies.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and The Hubble Heritage Team STScI/AURA)

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0626a
Type:Observation
Release date:13 June 2006, 19:00
Size:955 x 692 px

About the Object

Name:Arp 220, IC 4553
Type:• Local Universe : Galaxy : Activity : AGN : Seyfert
• X - Galaxies Images/Videos
Distance:250 million light years
Constellation:Serpens Caput

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BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
435 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
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555 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
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I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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