Rare Hubble Portrait of Io and Jupiter

Jupiter's moon Io and its shadow are hurling across the face of the biggest planet in our Solar System. Io itself is a very interesting moon, well known for its many active volcanoes. The smallest details visible on Io and Jupiter are about 150 km across. Bright patches visible on Io are regions of sulfur dioxide frost. Io is roughly the size of Earth's moon, but 2,000 times farther away.

This image, shows Jupiter's volcanic moon Io passing above the turbulent clouds of the giant planet, on July 24, 1996. The conspicuous black spot on Jupiter is Io's shadow.

The smallest details visible on Io and Jupiter are about 100 miles across (about 160 kilometres). Bright patches visible on Io are regions of sulfur dioxide frost. Io is roughly the size of Earth's moon, but 2, 000 times farther away.

Credit:

J. Spencer (Lowell Observatory), and NASA/ESA

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo9630a
Type:Observation
Release date:4 October 1996, 06:00
Size:720 x 600 px

About the Object

Name:Io, Jupiter
Type:• Solar System : Planet : Type : Gas Giant
• Solar System : Planet : Satellite
• X - Solar System Images/Videos

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Ultraviolet
U
340 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Ultraviolet
U
410 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2

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