A sea of galaxies

While one instrument of Hubble observed the target for its 27th anniversary — the galaxies NGC 4302 and NGC 4298 — another instrument simultaneously observed a nearby patch of the sky. These so-called parallel field observations increase the efficiency of how the telescope is used when making observations.

This specific parallel field shows an area of the sky, awash largely with spiral galaxies like our Milky Way. Most of the prominent galaxies look different only because they are tilted at various orientations with respect to Earth — from edge-on to face-on. A few others are currently interacting or in the process of a merger. The objects with diffraction spikes are foreground stars in our own galaxy.

Credit:

NASA, ESA, and M. Mutchler (STScI)

About the Image

Id:heic1709b
Type:Observation
Release date:20 April 2017, 16:00
Related releases:heic1709
Size:4012 x 4023 px

About the Object

Type:Local Universe : Galaxy
Constellation:Coma Berenices
Category:Galaxies

Image Formats

Large JPEG
3.7 MB
Screensize JPEG
208.3 KB

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Coordinates

Position (RA):12 21 49.16
Position (Dec):14° 28' 41.71"
Field of view:3.34 x 3.35 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 57.6° left of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
V
606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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