Arc in Visible light (Hubble)

The gravity of the cluster's trillion stars acts as a cosmic "zoom lens", bending and magnifying the light of the galaxies located far behind it, a technique called gravitational lensing. The faraway galaxies appear in the Hubble image as arc-shaped objects around the cluster, named Abell 1689. The increased magnification allows astronomers to study remote galaxies in greater detail.

One galaxy is so far away, however, it does not show up in this visible-light image taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys.

Credit:

NASA; ESA; L. Bradley (Johns Hopkins University); R. Bouwens (University of California, Santa Cruz); H. Ford (Johns Hopkins University); and G. Illingworth (University of California, Santa Cruz)

About the Image

NASA press release
Id:heic0805e
Type:Observation
Release date:12 February 2008, 15:00
Related releases:heic0805
Size:741 x 741 px

About the Object

Name:A1689-zD1, Abell 1689
Type:• Early Universe : Galaxy : Type : Gravitationally Lensed
• Early Universe : Galaxy : Grouping : Cluster
Distance:z=7.6 (redshift)
Constellation:Virgo

Image Formats

Large JPEG
269.6 KB
Screensize JPEG
379.3 KB

Coordinates

Position (RA):13 11 29.93
Position (Dec):-1° 19' 18.74"
Field of view:0.20 x 0.20 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 114.2° right of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
475 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
R
625 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
I
775 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
Z
850 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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