Hubble Watches Star Tear Apart its Neighborhood

NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has snapped a view of a stellar demolition zone in our Milky Way Galaxy: a massive star, nearing the end of its life, tearing apart the shell of surrounding material it blew off 250, 000 years ago with its strong stellar wind. The shell of material, dubbed the Crescent Nebula (NGC 6888), surrounds the 'hefty', aging star WR 136, an extremely rare and short-lived class of super-hot star called a Wolf-Rayet. Hubble's multicolored picture reveals with unprecedented clarity that the shell of matter is a network of filaments and dense knots, all enshrouded in a thin 'skin' of gas [seen in blue]. The whole structure looks like oatmeal trapped inside a balloon. The skin is glowing because it is being blasted by ultraviolet light from WR 136.

Credit:

NASA/ESA, Brian D. Moore, Jeff Hester, Paul Scowen (Arizona State University), Reginald Dufour (Rice University)

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0023b
Type:Observation
Release date:13 July 2000, 07:00
Size:1497 x 1517 px

About the Object

Name:Crescent Nebula, NGC 6888, WR 136
Type:• Milky Way : Star : Type : Wolf-Rayet
• Milky Way : Nebula : Appearance : Emission
• X - Stars Images/Videos
Distance:4500 light years
Constellation:Cygnus

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
OIII
502 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
H-alpha
656 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
SII
673 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2

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Large JPEG
2.1 MB
Screensize JPEG
847.9 KB

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763.4 KB
1280x1024
1.3 MB
1600x1200
1.8 MB

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