Hubble Sees a Neutron Star Alone in Space

This is the first direct look, in visible light, at a lone neutron star, as seen by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Hubble results show the star is very hot (1.2 million degrees Fahrenheit at the surface), and can be no larger than 16.8 miles (28 kilometers) across. These results prove that the object must be a neutron star, because no other known type of object can be this hot, small, and dim (below 25th magnitude).

Credit:

Fred Walter (State University of New York at Stony Brook), and NASA/ESA

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo9732b
Type:Observation
Release date:24 September 1997, 20:00
Size:398 x 399 px

About the Object

Name:RX J185635-3754
Type:• Milky Way : Star : Evolutionary Stage : Neutron Star
• X - Stars Images/Videos
Distance:200 light years

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Ultraviolet
U
300 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
V
606 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2

Image Formats

Large JPEG
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Screensize JPEG
378.9 KB

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