A stubborn dwarf galaxy

The fuzzy collection of stars seen in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image forms an intriguing dwarf galaxy named LEDA 677373, located about 14 million light-years away from us.

Dwarf galaxies are small, faint collections of stars and gas. Their diverse properties make them intriguing objects to astronomers, but their small size means that we can only explore those that lie closest to us, within the Local Group, such as LEDA 677373.

This particular dwarf galaxy contains a plentiful reservoir of gas from which it could form stars. However, it stubbornly refuses to do so. In a bid to find out why, Hubble imaged the galaxy’s individual stars at different wavelengths, a method that allows astronomers to figure out a star’s age. These observations showed that the galaxy has been around for at least six billion years — plenty of time to form stars. So why has it not done so?

Rather than being stubborn, LEDA 677373 seems to have been the unfortunate victim of a cosmic crime. A nearby giant spiral galaxy, Messier 83, seems to be stealing gas from the dwarf galaxy, stopping new stars from being born.

Credit:

ESA/Hubble & NASA

About the Image

Id:potw1627a
Type:Observation
Release date:4 July 2016, 06:00
Size:1114 x 790 px

About the Object

Name:LEDA 677373
Type:Local Universe : Galaxy : Size : Dwarf
Distance:14 million light years
Constellation:Centaurus
Category:Galaxies

Image Formats

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275.5 KB
Screensize JPEG
196.2 KB

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Coordinates

Position (RA):13 37 1.90
Position (Dec):-33° 21' 34.43"
Field of view:1.86 x 1.32 arcminutes
Orientation:North is 39.2° left of vertical

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
V
555 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
V
555 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2
Optical
I
814 nm Hubble Space Telescope
WFPC2

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