Hubble Looks Through Cosmic Zoom Lens

The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has used a natural 'zoom lens' in space to boost its view of the distant universe. Besides offering an unprecedented and dramatic new view of the cosmos, the results promise to shed light on galaxy evolution and dark matter in space. Hubble peered straight through the center of one of the most massive galaxy clusters known, called Abell 1689.

For this observation, Hubble had to gaze at the distant cluster, located 2.2 billion light-years away, for more than 13 hours. The gravity of the cluster's trillion stars " plus dark matter " acts as a 2-million-light-year-wide 'lens' in space. This 'gravitational lens' bends and magnifies the light of galaxies located far behind it, distorting their shapes and creating multiple images of individual galaxies.

Credit:

NASA, N. Benitez (JHU), T. Broadhurst (The Hebrew University), H. Ford (JHU), M. Clampin(STScI), G. Hartig (STScI), G. Illingworth (UCO/Lick Observatory), the ACS Science Team and ESA

About the Image

NASA press release
NASA caption
Id:opo0301a
Type:Observation
Release date:7 January 2003, 18:20
Size:3853 x 4000 px

About the Object

Name:Abell 1689
Type:• Early Universe : Galaxy : Grouping : Supercluster
• X - Galaxies Images/Videos
• X - Cosmology Images/Videos
Distance:z=0.183 (redshift)
Constellation:Virgo

Colours & filters

BandWavelengthTelescope
Optical
B
475 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Optical
R
625 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
I
775 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS
Infrared
Z
850 nm Hubble Space Telescope
ACS

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